Concurrently, the gallery presents "Twice Told", an inaugural solo show by emerging artist Stephanie Washburn. Her work explores the persistence of human touch in relationship to pictorial flatness, and the resulting interface between painterly and digitally mediated images. Featuring photographs from the series “Reception,” and a related video project "Hoser,"  Washburn coalesces real and fictive states through the interplay between televised imagery and ordinary household items. Materials such as butter, pillow stuffing, and cling wrap fuse with the television content to create an array of abstractions and counter narratives. At times celebratory, destructive, and humorous, Washburn's luminescent displays advocate for an agency in perception, and return us to the fraught politics of the body.

 

 

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Lecturer Stephanie Washburn’s “Twice Told” on display at Mark Moore Gallery

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For the second time, Mark Moore Gallery is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of new works by new media artist Jason Salavon. “Tragedy of the Commons”

will showcase Salavon’s self-authored software, which source and reconfigure cultural data into visual compositions. Abstracted into composite images and patterns, statistics and mass culture become conceptual diagrams for our social insatiability – representational not so much in figuration, but rather in discerning observation.

 

Concurrently, the gallery presents “Twice Told”, an inaugural solo show by emerging artist Stephanie Washburn. Her work explores the persistence of human touch in relationship to pictorial flatness, and the resulting interface between painterly and digitally mediated images. Featuring photographs from the series “Reception,” and a related video project “Hoser,”  Washburn coalesces real and fictive states through the interplay between televised imagery and ordinary household items. Materials such as butter, pillow stuffing, and cling wrap fuse with the television content to create an array of abstractions and counter narratives. At times celebratory, destructive, and humorous, Washburn’s luminescent displays advocate for an agency in perception, and return us to the fraught politics of the body.